Cullen Family History
 and Genealogy

Notes


Matches 151 to 200 of 448

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151 In 1871, Ellen was farming 100 acres on Lot 20, Range 6 in the Quinnville, Quebec area. Kearnan, Ellen (I281)
 
152 In 1871, John was farming 50 acres on Range 6 Lot 11 in Templeton Township. Bulger, John (I2245)
 
153 In 1871, Lawrence Power occupied 100 acres at Range 5, Lot 13. He lived with his wife and sons Thomas and John in 2 dwellings. They operated a mixed farm on 25 improved acres and 10 acres of pasture. They had 2 barns, 1 wagon, 1 horse, 4 milk cows, 4 other cattle and 1 pig. They produced 16 tons of hay and 400 lbs of butter. Power, Lawrence (I6145)
 
154 In 1871, Martin Dady farmed 100 acres on Lot 7, Range 2 in Templeton Township. This was the lot beside the original Cullen homestead. He had 2 horses, 3 milk cows, 1 other cattle, 9 sheep and 1 pig. In the previous year, he produced 240 lbs. butter, 32 lbs wool and 25 yds. of cloth and flannel. He also sold 1 mink fur. Dadey, Martin (I7003)
 
155 In 1871, Michael was a labourer likely for his step-father, Thomas Tully, and was living with Tully and his mother, Mary Cullen Barrett.

In 1891, newly married Michael and Margaret were living in Spanish River, Algoma District. He was a farmer.

In 1901, Michael and Margaret were living in Nipissing. He was a farmer.

In 1911, they were living in Massey in Algoma East. He was a scaler in a lumber camp, working 65 hours per week and earning $720 annually.
At the time of his second marriage in 1932, he was a salesman.
At the time of his death, Michael was living at 417 Lisgar Street in Ottawa. 
Cullen, Michael Thomas (I369)
 
156 In 1871, Richard Burke was farming 100 acres on Lot 27, Range 4 in Templeton Township. Burke, Richard (I2115)
 
157 In 1871, Simeon was farming 50 acres at Range 1 Lot 16 in L'Ange Gardien.
In 1901 Simeon Joanis lived in an 8 room house and farmed 16 acres on Lot 14 Range 2 in L'Ange Gardien Township. 
Depocas-dit-Joanis, Siméon (I3410)
 
158 In 1871, Ulrick was farming on 100 acres at Lot 27, Range 4 in Templeton Township. Burke, Ulrick (I1728)
 
159 In 1881, Hermias and family were living in Lapointe Village. He was a farmer.

He was either killed by a falling tree (according to Eugenie Têtu) or drowned on a fishing trip (according to Florence T. Jones). He left no will so the estate went to his wife and through her to her second husband and their family. 
Lapointe, Alexandre Hermias (I2402)
 
160 In 1891, David was a mining labourer. Power, David (I222)
 
161 In 1891, George Cameron was an engineer with the Intercolonial Railroad. Cameron, George (I4805)
 
162 In 1891, Patrick was a mining labourer. 1901, Patrick and his family were faming 200 acres on Range 6, Lot 9 in East Templeton Quebec. Power, Patrick (I146)
 
163 In 1893, Jules was working as a joiner in Casselman, Ontario. In 1900, he was a millright at the W.S. Edwards mills in Rockland.
About 1898, Jules Joanis wrote the following note to his children ( translated by Pauline Cullen in 1997):

"I am writing this "memoire" so that, in the event of our death, your mother and I, we leave this notebook so that you will know our ages as well as your own.
My dear children, you have only to consult this notebook as I, Jules Joanis and Délina Quévillon, were married at L'Ange Gardien, where we were both born. We were married on Monday, November 17th in 1884 at the age of 22 and 17, respectively.
I purchased our property in the Township of Clarence, Russell County on September 20, 1895 at $25.00 per with $6 interest on $300.00. On September 18, 1897, I made the third payment and also one payment in advance".

(the dates and place of birth were then listed) 
Joanis, Jules (I946)
 
164 In 1897. Joseph was farming at Concession 10, Lot 3 in Clarence Creek. Later, he farmed at C 10 Lot 7. Wolfe, Joseph (I2267)
 
165 In 1900, Mary Jane was living in Lowell, Massachusetts Lapointe, Mary Jane Demerise (I4520)
 
166 In 1901 Adrien Joanis lived in a 7 room house and farmed 60 acres on Lot 1 Range 1 in L'Ange Gardien Township. Joanis, Adrien (I2658)
 
167 In 1901 Alfred was living with his father-in-law, Theodore Minault, on a farm on Lot 28 Range 4/5 L'Ange Gardien Township. Maisonneuve, Alfred (I2355)
 
168 In 1901 Amable Taillon lived in a 6 room house and farmed on 25 acres on Lot 14, Range 2 in L'Ange Gardien Township. Taillon, Amable (I2438)
 
169 In 1901 Charles Mongeon lived in a 6 room house and farmed 180 acres on Lot 28c, Range 1 in L'Ange Gardien Township. Mongeon, Charles (I2855)
 
170 In 1901 Charles Mongeon was living in a 6 room house and farming 180 acres on Lot 28C Range 1 L'Ange Gardien Township. The property contained 10 barns and outbuildings. (1901 Census) Mongeon, Thomas (I3089)
 
171 In 1901 Damien Quevillon lived in a one room house on Lot 27b, Range 1 in L'Ange Gardien Township. Quévillon, Damien (I2299)
 
172 In 1901 David lived in a 6 room hose and farmed 225 acres on Lot 11, Range 14 in Hull Township. Milks, David S (I6874)
 
173 In 1901 Delphis Joanis rented a 7 room house on Rue Principale, Masson. Joanis, Delphis J (I3064)
 
174 In 1901 Dosithe Joanis was living in a 7 room house and farmed 20 acres on Lot 14 Range 2 in L'Ange Gardien Township. He also leased another 100 acres. Joanis, Dosithé (I2633)
 
175 In 1901 Georges Joanis rented a 7 room house at 46 Rue de Cadastres, Masson. Joanis, Georges Aimé (I2443)
 
176 In 1901 Isaie was living in a 2 room house and farming 55 acres on Lot 27B Range 2 L'Ange Gardien Township. Quévillon, Isaie (I2614)
 
177 In 1901 James Cosgrove lived in a 4 room house and farmed 382 acres on Lot 21 Range 4 in Buckingham Township. Cosgrove, James (I895)
 
178 In 1901 Jean-Baptiste Joanis lived in a 6 room house and farmed 16 acres on Lot 14 Range 2 in L'Ange Gardien Township Joanis, Jean-Baptiste (I2921)
 
179 In 1901 Joseph Storey lived in a 4 room house and farmed 42 acres of Lot 1 range 5 and 50 acres of Lot 3 Range 6 in Buckingham Township. Storey, Joseph (I936)
 
180 In 1901 Moise Quevillon lived in an 8 room house and farmed 100 acres on Lot 15 Range 9 in Portland East Township. Quévillon, Moïse (I2277)
 
181 In 1901 Palma Lahaie lived in a 3 room house and farmed on 53 acres on Lot 8b Range 1 in L'Ange Gardien Township. He also leased a furthjer 60 acres. Lahaie, Palma (I2832)
 
182 In 1901 Patrick lived in a 7 room house and farmed 100 acres on Lot 2, Range 7 Casey, Patrick (I382)
 
183 In 1901 Samuel was living in a 5 room house and farming 92 acres on Lots 23 A & B Range 2 in L'Ange Gardien Township. Kilby, Samuel (I328)
 
184 In 1901 Theodore Minault was living in a 6 room house and farmed 236 acres on Lot 28 Range 4/5 in L'Ange Gardien Township. Mineault, Théodore (I2361)
 
185 In 1901 Xavier Mongeon lived in a 3 room house and farmed 180 acres on Lot 28a, Range 1 in L'Ange Gardien Township. Mongeon, Xavier (I2864)
 
186 In 1901, Andrew O'Brien lived in a 7 room house and farmed 100 acres on Lot 7, Range 5 in Templeton Township. O'Brien, Andrew (I793)
 
187 In 1901, Joseph was living with his family in a 6 room house and farmed 70 acres on part of Lot 55, Range C. Carroll, Joseph Patrick (I6924)
 
188 In 1901, Mary Burke was living with her children Norman, Melina and Maud in a 9 room house and farmed 200 acres on Lot 3, Range 10 of Hull Township. Lynch, Mary Ann (I1323)
 
189 In 1903, Amédée was a farmer at Lot 3 Concession 9 Clarence Township. In 1913, on the birth record of his son Jules, his residence is listed as Lot 3, Concession 10. Joanis, Amedée (I1213)
 
190 In 1906, he married Delina Quevillon, widow of Jules Joanis. In 1911, Joseph was a teamster at the Edwards sawmill in Rockland. The family was living on Albert street in Rockland and included two sons from his first marriage and three step-daughters and 2 step-sons. Gauthier, Joseph (I621)
 
191 In 1911, Laura was a school teacher in Rockland. Joanis, Laura Euphémie (I990)
 
192 In 1930 and 1940, Lawrence and family were living in Attleboro, Massachusetts. He was the operator of a gas station. Kennedy, Lawrence E (I4733)
 
193 In an 1859 listing of superannuated teachers in Canada West, Hugh is shown as receiving annual pension of $7.25. He commenced teaching in Ireland in 1803, taught there for 16 years, emigrated to Montreal and taught in Lower Canada for 16 years, then taught a further 18 years in Upper Canada.

Upon emigrating to Canada, he was first in Montreal. Then he moved to the Ste. Marie de Monnoir area (now Marieville, Quebec) where he built and operated a school. He was also in the militia of Bedford Township and was promoted to Captain on March 5, 1824.

In A.H.D. Ross' book, Ottawa, Past and Present, Hugh O'Hagan is mentioned. "In 1833 Hugh O'Hagan (later known as Hugh Hagan) came here from St. Mary's, Ontario [sic], and opened a school close to the corner of Sussex and Murray Streets. Lett says he was 'A man with learning, grace and mildness pictured in his face'". In the same book, O'Hagan is listed as one of 12 teachers employed in 1847 by the Common School Trustees of Bytown.

In "The Mile of History" (National Capital Commission 1981), Lucien Brault states that Hugh Hagan operated a school on the east side of Sussex Street between Clarence and Murray Streets. "On the Leblanc and Lemay store site, Hugh Hagan in 1837 had opened an English and Commercial Academy in a little wooden house formerly occupied by Michel Brosseau, a saddler. Subjects taught were reading, elocution, writing, English grammer, arithmetic, history, geography and bookkeeping."

In 1861, he was living as a "gentleman" with his wife Ann in Templeton Township. 
Hagan, Hugh (I6056)
 
194 In December 1898, the family was devastated with the deaths, within two days of each other, of Frank and Emma's eldest and youngest sons, 19 year old Frank on the 10th, and almost two year old Edward Chalmers on the 12th.
Frank's death was caused by a "pulmonary abscess induced by a defective heart valve". At the time of his death, he was working as a stationary engineer. Edward died after suffering nine days of bronchial pneumonia. Their joint funeral was held on December 12th in St. Patrickís Church and they were buried in the family plot in Notre Dame Cemetery.
Emma's great granddaughter, Jan de Grosbois Campbell, passed on this story from her grandmother Amy about that awful week. In early December young Frank had decided to participate in an event that involved lifting heavy weights, a popular sport at the time. In lifting, he pulled all the muscles in his chest, severely affecting his heart. Emma tried to nurse him back to health, but he died some days later. Meanwhile Emma had been so worried about Frank, she didn't realize that Chalmers had contracted pneumonia. She was unable to nurse him back to health and he also succumbed. Amy remembered the funeral and the "beautiful little box" her baby brother got to lie in. 
Turner, Francis Henry Tancrede (I1358)
 
195 In December 1898, the family was devastated with the deaths, within two days of each other, of their eldest and youngest sons, 19 year old Frank on the 10th and almost two year old Chalmers on the 12th. Frankís death was caused by a ìpulmonary abscess induced by a defective heart valveî. At the time of his death, he was working as a stationary engineer. Edward died after suffering nine days of bronchial pneumonia. Their joint funeral was held on December 12th in St. Patrickís Church and they were buried in the family plot in Notre Dame Cemetery. Cousin Jan de Grosbois Campbell passed on this story from her grandmother Amy about that awful week. In early December young Frank had decided to participate in an event that involved lifting heavy weights, a popular sport at the time. In lifting, he pulled all the muscles in his chest, severely affecting his heart. Emma tried to nurse him back to health, but he died some days later. Meanwhile Emma had been so worried about Frank, she didnít realize that Chalmers had contracted pneumonia. She was unable to nurse him back to health and he also succumbed. Amy remembered the funeral and the ìbeautiful little boxî her baby brother got to lie in. Turner, Edward Chalmers (I1435)
 
196 In Douglas, Olivier was an axe maker. Quévillon, Olivier (I6675)
 
197 In early June 1942, Mark Turner was with the RCAF as a wireless operator/air gunner on Vickers Wellington bombers as part of RAF 1 Group Bomber Command, No. 103 Squadron. The Squadron was operating out of Elsham Wolds airbase in north east central England and likely participated in the famous "Thousand Bomber Raids" launched on May 30 and June 1 against Cologne and Essen, respectively. Wellingtons were by far the most numerous aircraft used in these raids.

On the night of June 8, 1942, Bomber Command launched a raid of 170 aircraft to Essen. The aircraft consisted of 92 Wellingtons, 42 Halifaxes, 14 Stirlings, 13 Lancasters, 9 Hampdens.
19 aircraft including 7 Wellingtons were lost. The raid was not a success. The target was not identified accurately and bombing was scattered over a wide area. Essen suffered light housing damage.

Vickers Wellington S/N DV773 of RAF Squadron 103, based in Elsham Wolds, was part of this raid. It departed at 11:16pm and at about 1:55am on June 9th was shot down by a German Me 110 night fighter piloted by Luftwaffe pilot Feldwebel Walter Spille near Bakel, about 5km northeast of Helmond, Holland. Bakel is on the flight path from Elsham to Essen, about 100 kms from Essen. The crew consisted of P/O JE Firman, Sgt. J. MacQueen, Sgt. JAM Turner (RCAF), Sgt. FEW Ball and Sgt. H. Halliwell. All were killed and are buried in Eindhoven (Woensel) General Cemetery.

The Canadian War Graves Commission records state as follows

Name: Turner, Jean Albert Marc
Nationality:Canadian
Rank:Flight Sergeant (W. Op./Air Gnr) (wireless operator/air gunner)
Regiment/Service:Royal Canadian Air Force
Unit Text:103 (RAF) Sqdn
Date of death:09/06/1942
Service No:R/82814
Additional Info:Son of George Joseph and Bernadette Turner of Hurdman's Bridge, Ontario
Casualty Type:Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/memorial ref:Plot JJ Grave 74
Cemetery:Eindhoven (Woensel) General Cemetery

Cemetery: EINDHOVEN (WOENSEL) GENERAL CEMETERY
Country: Netherlands
Locality: Noord-Brabant
Visiting Information: Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number: 01628 507200

Location Information: Eindhoven is located 31 kilometres south-east of s'Hertogenbosch and 14 kilometres south-west of Helmond. The Cemetery is in Baffinlaan in the suburb of Woensel in the northern part of the town. From the E34 motorway turn off at the junction with N69 and follow the N69 in the direction of Eindhoven. At the second crossroads, turn right into Leostraat which forms part of the Eindhoven ring. Follow the ring along Piuslaan, Hugo van der Goeslaan, Jeroen Boschlaan, Insulindelaan and onto the N270; Onze Lieve Vrouwestraat. At the junction with the N265; the John F Kennedylaan, go straight over to the next junction with the Veldmaarschalk Montgomerylaan. Turn right here and follow this road to the crossroads. Turn right at the crossroads into Europalaan and take the second turning on the right into Baffinlaan. The cemetery is along here on the right hand side.

Historical Information: Almost four-fifths of the men buried here belonged to the air forces, and lost their lives in raids over this part of Holland or in returning from Germany, between 1941 and 1944. Men of the land forces who are buried here died between September 1944 and May 1945. The 79th and 86th British General Hospitals were located at Eindhoven during almost all that period. There are now nearly 700, 1939-45 war casualties commemorated in this site.

No. of Identified Casualties: 679 
Turner, John Albert Mark (I6444)
 
198 In her baptism record Mary Ann's mother is listed as Margaret Shea Kennedy, Mary Anne (I6981)
 
199 In his burial record, Samuel's occupation is listed as "sculpteur". Doré, Samuel (I760)
 
200 In his wife's death record, Jean-Baptiste's occupation is listed as "carrossier" or coachbuilder. Depocas-dit-Joanis, Jean-Baptiste (I6525)
 

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